This Election Cycle: What Jesus and John Have to Say to Christians

The temptation for Christians to polarize against each other over politics has never been greater than this election cycle, and it's only going to grow stronger. Here's what it's coming to for many:
  • If you vote for Clinton/Trump (pick one), you're not a Christian and you're not my brother or sister. You're my enemy.
  • Not voting is actually a vote for the other candidate.* Therefore you're my enemy.
  • Voting for a third party or a write-in is a wasted vote. It's pretty much the same thing as option two, so once again, you're my enemy.
Lots of enemies out there, according to the above logic. I'm afraid a lot of us who call ourselves Christians are going to be become tremendously embittered against other Christians—except, of course, those "other Christians" aren't really Christians. If they were, they'd see things our way. The right way. God's way.
 
Where does Jesus actually enter into this mess? Consider these words:
 “You have heard that it was said, ‘Love your neighbor and hate your enemy.’ But I tell you, love your enemies and pray for those who persecute you, that you may be children of your Father in heaven. He causes his sun to rise on the evil and the good, and sends rain on the righteous and the unrighteous. If you love those who love you, what reward will you get? Are not even the tax collectors doing that? And if you greet only your own people, what are you doing more than others? Do not even pagans do that? Be perfect, therefore, as your heavenly Father is perfect." (Matt. 5:43-48 NIV)
That is a tall, tall order. Thankfully, most of those whom we consider enemies because their politics and priorities differ from ours are nothing like the Romans of Jesus's day, or the Nazis of yesterday, or ISIS today. If you were drowning, your "enemy" would throw you a lifeline, and you'd do the same for that person. The truth is, many of those "enemies" are in fact brothers and sisters in Christ. Granted, an awful lot of people who call themselves Christians are not Christians, and some truly do behave in hateful ways. But that still leaves countless followers of Jesus who simply see things differently from us, and our vilifying them may say more about the condition of our own heart than theirs. What if the one who acts most like an enemy is us?
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The apostle John minces no words about what our attitude should be—and should never be:
Anyone who claims to be in the light but hates a brother or sister is still in the darkness. Anyone who loves their brother and sister lives in the light, and there is nothing in them to make them stumble. But anyone who hates a brother or sister is in the darkness and walks around in the darkness. They do not know where they are going, because the darkness has blinded them. (1 John 2:9-11)
The Scripture quotes above are the words of two men whose motives were utterly trustworthy and untainted by any political self-interest. Their statements don't require fact checking; you either believe them or you don't. The question is, do you believe them—and in this political season and following, will you do your best to adhere to them? That doesn't mean you can't feel strongly and even indignantly. But will you guard your heart? Because in this world, intense sentiments all too easily step across the line and become self-justifying hatred.
 
Remember: The real battle isn't about who will sit in the Oval Office. It's about whom you will allow to control your heart.
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* Actually, it's a vote of no confidence in either candidate. But let's briefly consider this thinking of "Not voting is a vote for the other candidate." Some of my friends like Trump and others support Hillary. So which "other candidate" would I be voting for by not voting? Both, apparently. Since it's a self-cancelling exercise, the impact on either side is precisely zero.
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