Thoughts on the I-94 Pileup near Kalamazoo

By now, the whole nation has viewed a blizzard of video clips of the massive and deadly 193-car/truck pileup on I-94 in Galesburg, Michigan, between Kalamazoo and Battle Creek. The incident occurred just forty miles straight south of where I live. Since I'm well-acquainted with both that highway and what yesterday's weather was like, I'll share a few thoughts. First, winter storm warnings were in effect, and people were cautioned not to venture out if they didn't have to. No one can say they weren't warned; the NWS and media did their jobs. Moreover, some sections of highway were closed due to extreme driving conditions, something that just doesn't happen in this state. Second, and significantly, I-94 is a major east-west truck artery. Whenever I'm on it, I'm struck by the number of semis I see. There are a lot of them, considerably more than on I-196, I-96, and US-131. Of course, there are plenty of big rigs on those highways as well; there just seem to be more on I-94, to the point where I feel like truckers own that particular interstate. This is nothing against truckers and not some kind of moral issue; it's just my observation. If an accident happens on that road, then if it doesn't initiate with a semi, it can easily and almost immediately involve one . Third, roads yesterday were extremely icy. On my drive to and from Caledonia to my part-time job in Hastings down M-37, a major secondary route, I averaged around 35 mph and often less. In open areas, the blowing wind created "road smoke," and on the way back, trucks coming from the opposite direction blew up massive clouds of snow, creating temporary whiteouts. Trucks are really good at doing this, particularly during weather like yesterday's, when extremely cold temperatures makes for fine snow rather than big, chunky flakes. If the conditions on I-94 were anything like what I encountered on M-37, where people were driving at an appropriate speed for conditions, then I have to wonder what on earth folks were thinking to be clipping along at much faster speeds. It's rarely the weather conditions that get people in trouble; it's how people respond to them—or more exactly, fail to respond. Unfortunately, responsible drivers suffer as well. You can be driving 30 mph, putting plenty of distance between yourself and the guy ahead of you so you can stop in time to avoid either rear-ending that person or going off the road, only to have the idiot behind you slam into you at 60 mph. I'm sure that scenario repeated itself multiple times yesterday. Road conditions can change fast and catch you and other drivers unaware. Yesterday, M-37 through Caledonia wasn't bad; a combination of road salt and local traffic had rendered much of the pavement wet rather than icy. But on the south end of town, beginning at 100th St., conditions changed abruptly from driveable to treacherous. One fatality is a tragedy, but after watching video of the pileup as it occurred, I'm amazed and glad that more people didn't die. In addition, twenty-three were injured, and again, that figure could easily have been higher. The bottom line is simple: Don't drive too fast for road conditions, and sometimes don't drive at all. I would add, avoid routes with heavy truck traffic such as I-94, as trucks can create whiteouts in their wake. For outstanding, well-researched  insights and safety tips on winter driving, visit Dan Robinson's website, Icy Road Safety.
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